2003 in Review

Where did 2003 go? It seems like just yesterday was the middle of the summer, and now we’re on the doorstep of 2004. While I sit around and wait for OS X 10.3 (Panther) to finish installing on my laptop, I can revew some of my favorite posts from this past year, in no particular order:
Songs:

Best open offer:

  • Your Logo Here (There are still many opportunites for sponsoring AndrewRaff.com! Right now, I’m looking to fill the Official Summer Employer spot I have open.)

Photos:

Photos of NY landmarks celebrating notable anniversaries:

Relatively substantive analysis:

Best Movie Criticism:

Best post where I acknowledge that I own Meco’s Star Wars and Other Galactic Funk:

Fun with Numbers:

Two favorite uncategorized posts:

This year in review isn’t quite as much fun as my 2002 year in review, probably because I posted links off on their own this year and did not include them in this review. Feel free to review the 1466 Linky links I posted since March.
I’ll be back next week. Have a happy new year.

Senators stand up for spam bill

Senators Wyden and Burns: Why we’ve finally canned spam

In the end, fighting spam is going to require a multipronged approach. It will require improved technology, which is why we welcome the recent announcement that Yahoo is working on technology to authenticate the source of e-mails. Greater cross-border cooperation is needed, which is why we joined three U.K. Parliament members to urge our respective governments to engage in bilateral cooperation on spam enforcement. Of course, kingpin spammers must also face tough criminal and civil penalties, which is why we proudly co-authored the Can-Spam Act.

No injunction for pop-ups

Boston.com: Judge says Internet company can send pop-ups for now

A federal judge ruled Monday that a California company can send ”pop-up” Internet ads that regulators have called ”high-tech extortion” at least until the matter is decided at trial.
U.S. District Judge Andre Davis said there was insufficient evidence for him to grant a preliminary injunction sought by the Federal Trade Commission. Regulators wanted to stop San Diego-based D-Squared Solutions LLC from selling its ad-blocking software.

Evidence Hokey Pokey

You put the evidence in
you take the hearsay out
Then impeach it with old statements
and get it all thrown out
You admit the good evidence
and keep the bad stuff out
That’s what it’s all about
You get your documents in
Take the privileged stuff out
Put the experts on
And then Daubert sorts them out
You admit the good evidence
and keep the bad stuff out
That’s what it’s all about
You put the relevant in
Take the prejudicial out
Lay a foundation first
And keep the character stuff out
You admit the good evidence
and keep the bad stuff out
That’s what it’s all about
401 in
403 out
803 in
’cause those exceptions are allowed
You admit the good evidence
and keep the bad stuff out
That’s what it’s all about
National Institute of Health Science: Hokey Pokey, with MIDI music and dancing penguins. Thanks, US Department of Health & Human Services!