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Last week, the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Commerce, Trade, and Consumer Protection held hearings on Digital Content and Enabling Technology: Satisfying the 21st Century Consumer. This is the second half of the podcast about these hearings, focusing in on fair use, DRM/TPM and anti-circumvention.

IPTelligentsia Podcast: Satisfying the 21st Century Consumer (Part 2/2) (24:14, 22MB MP3).

Related:
Freedom to Tinker: Bernard Lang Reports on the Proposed French DRM Law

Open Media Commons

Eliot Van Buskirk, Wired News: Reasons to Love Open Source DRM

Timothy B. Lee, Cato Institute: Circumventing Competition: The Perverse Consequences of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act

David Pogue, NY Times: review of Slingbox

Consumer Electronics Assoc: CEA Praises Digital Technology Hearing; Urges Congress to Resist Content Industry Pleas for Technology Mandates; Increased U.S. Jobs and Employment Thanks to Tech Innovation

Broadcasting & Cable: Alternate TV Takes the Hill

Previously: IPTelligentsia Podcast: Satisfying the 21st Century Consumer (Part 1)

Yesterday, the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Commerce, Trade, and Consumer Protection held hearings on Digital Content and Enabling Technology: Satisfying the 21st Century Consumer.

Today's podcast discusses the content of those hearings: IPtelligentsia Podcast: House Fair Use Hearings (29:13 MP3)

I apologize in advance for the poor quality-- technical problems (a bad microphone cable, I think) made it difficult to record, and as a result the presentation is less polished than usual. But this is the blogosphere, where timeliness reigns supreme.


On Thursday, the Senate Commerce Committee held hearings about regulating indecency on television. Sen. Ted Stevens (R-AK) and some of his colleagues seem intent on curbing broadcast and cablecast indecency by new legislation or some extra-legislative means, notwithstanding the fact that extending such regulations to cable and the internet would violate the First Amendment.

IPtelligentsia Podcast: Senate Decency Hearings (Part 2 of 3) (20:32 MP3)

Related links:
Decency: Full Committee Hearing (witness list and archived webcast)

FCC v. Pacifica Foundation, 438 U.S. 726 (1978).
United States v. Playboy Entertainment Group, Inc., 529 U.S. 803 (2000).
Reno v. Am. Civil Liberties Union, 521 U.S. 844 (1997).
Sable Communications v. FCC, 492 U.S. 115, 127 (1989).
Action for Children’s Television v. FCC, 58 F.3d 654 (1995)
FCC: Obscenity, Indeceny and Profanity

Previously:
Senate Indecency Hearings (Part 1 of 3)
Videoblog: Arrested Development Indecency Ruling

This morning, the Senate Commerce Committee held hearings about regulating indecency on television. Sen. Ted Stevens (R-AK) and some of his colleagues seem intent on curbing broadcast and cablecast indecency by new legislation or some extra-legislative means, notwithstanding the fact that extending such regulations to cable and the internet would violate the First Amendment.

IPtelligentsia Podcast: Senate Decency Hearings (Part 1 of 3) (30:33 MP3)

Related links:
Decency: Full Committee Hearing (witness list and archived webcast)

FCC v. Pacifica Foundation, 438 U.S. 726 (1978).
United States v. Playboy Entertainment Group, Inc., 529 U.S. 803 (2000).
Reno v. Am. Civil Liberties Union, 521 U.S. 844 (1997).
Sable Communications v. FCC, 492 U.S. 115, 127 (1989).
Action for Children’s Television v. FCC, 58 F.3d 654 (1995)

Jeff Jarvis, BuzzMachine: Being Heard on Indecency and the FCC: "it is shameful that Brent Bozell is heard — though he does not represent mainstream America — and no one is called on to speak for First Amendment rights in a Senate hearing about government restricting speech."

Comcast Parental Controls
Comcast unveils Family Tier

FCC: Obscenity, Indeceny and Profanity

USA Today: Congress takes issue with family TV tiers

Previously: Videoblog: Arrested Development Indecency Ruling

Lately, I have been looking through FCC rulings on broadcast indecency. One recent ruling concerned the television program Arrested Development, which I recently picked up on DVD. Combine the two and you get something that is almost edutainment (except for, well, the education and the entertainment): the first IPTAblog videoblog, or, is it a videocast? Podvideo?

IPTAblog Multimedia Extravaganza: Arrested Development, Indecency and the FCC (Quicktime, 18.8 MB, 5 minutes).

Update (Jun. 14): By popular demand (see the comments below), I've posted an updated version of the vblog entry that mixes the music at a lower volume. Considering that I don't really know what I'm doing when it comes to video, any amateurish results are the direct result of that lack of knowledge.

IPtelligentsia Podcast

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Hey, look, there goes a bandwagon!

I'm jumping on and figured I'd give podcasting a shot.

IPtelligentsia podcast 2005-03-21.

This 'cast looks at MGM v. Grokster, in particular, how the arguments made at oral arguments were reflected in the 9th Circuit ruling. This is not particularly useful pedagogy compared with using the briefs, but it does make for more interesting audio. Mainly, this was a way of giving the latest 'net fad a try.

Lessons learned: 1. This takes much longer than I thought. I only managed to use a single primary source, instead of the few I planned on. 2. I have a voice for text blogging (it's sort of like having a face for radio).

Should I do future podcasts? That depends not only on whether I can find audio primary sources or figure out how to record interviews, but on whether it is any more interesting than plain old text blogging. Audio is a very different medium from text, and a useful podcast depends on finding something that works better in that medium.

Here are the useful links:
MGM v. Grokster (9th Cir., 2004)

EFF Case Archive: MGM v. Grokster

US Copyright Office: United States Files Brief in “File-Sharing” Case

Groklaw: Transcript of oral argument in Grokster

IT Conversations: Law and IT: MGM v. Grokster: Ernest Miler talks with Tim Wu, Denise Howell, Charles Petit and Fred von Lohmann.