Category: Privacy

[Headline Redacted]

The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court of Appeals released a redacted version of its ruling from August 2008 upholding the constitutionality of a statute authorizing an intelligence program to wiretap international phone calls and intercept e-mail messages without a specific court order. In re: Directives [redacted text]* Pursuant to Section 105B of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (No. 08-01) The court… Read more →

IP Colloquium: Privacy in a Networked World

UCLA Law professor Doug Lichtman hosts The Intellectual Property Colloquium– a series of hour-long podcasts of conversations with leading legal thinkers about current issues in IP law. Professor Lichtman writes, “The conversation is about the legal rules that apply when sites like Facebook, LinkedIn, and MySpace gather private information from their users. Does Facebook have any liability, for instance, if… Read more →

Cultivating Online Personas

In New York Magazine, Rex Sorgatz lays out a few simple steps for finding internet fame, The Microfame Game and The New Rules of Internet Celebrity — New York Magazine: “It’s easy to be cynical about this new class of celebrity. The lines between empowerment and self-promotion, between sharing and oversharing, between community and cliques, can be blurry. You can… Read more →

Blockbuster Sued over Facebook Beacon Program

Remember Facebook’s Beacon program? That’s the program that uses Facebook user’s purchase information on partner websites to advertise those websites to the user’s social network. Here are a couple of posts on the controversy from David at Inside the Marketer’s Studio blog that explain the controversy: Facebook Social Ads Need an Opt-Out Facebook’s About Face on Social Ads (Finally) A… Read more →

Assorted Reading

Privacy and Anonymity Kevin F. Berry, Law.com: How to Unmask an Anonymous Blogger: “When does it make sense to spend the time and expense necessary to determine the identity of an anonymous blogger who is damaging the company?” New York Times: The Theater of the Street, the Subject of the Photograph: “The suit was dismissed last month by a New… Read more →

NSA Warrantless Electronic Surveillance Reading List

Here are some links discussing the Constitutionality of the Bush Administration’s warrantless electronic surveillance program as well as related issues: Congressional Research Service: Presidential Authority to Conduct Warrantless Electronic Surveillance to Gather Foreign Intelligence Information: “This memorandum lays out a general framework for analyzing the constitutional and statutory issues raised by the NSA electronic surveillance activity. It then outlines the… Read more →

Washingtonienne Privacy Lawsuit

Julie Hilden: Are Accounts of Consensual Sex a Violation of Privacy Rights? The Lawsuit Against the Blogger “Washingtonienne”: Jessica Cutler – better known as ‘Washingtonienne’ — achieved notoriety with a web log (‘blog’) about her sexual exploits, written while she was a staffer for U.S. Senator Michael DeWine of Ohio. When her identity became known, Cutler was fired – but… Read more →

Data Aggregators Aggregate Errors

Privacy Activism: Data Aggregators: A Study on Data Quality and Responsiveness This study examined the quality of data provided by ChoicePoint and Acxiom, two of the largest consumer data brokers in the United States, as well as their responsiveness to consumer requests – and found significant areas of concern in both areas.                                    100% of the reports given out by… Read more →

Identity Theft for Fun and Profit

bIPlog’ Tara Wheatland explains how much of the news reporting has completely missed the point of the ChoicePoint scandal– it is not hacking, but the company’s practices and policy. Un-Spinning the ChoicePoint Scandal: The persons, admittedly criminals, who gained access to “critical personal data” on hundreds of thousands of U.S. citizens did not steal the data–ChoicePoint sold it to them.…… Read more →

The value of disclosure requirements

Bruce Schneier notes that only a California information privacy statute forced Choicepoint to disclose the fact that it shared consumers’ personal information with a group of criminals. Schneier on Security: ChoicePoint This story would have never been made public if it were not for SB 1386, a California law requiring companies to notify California residents if any of a specific… Read more →